Archive for the ‘Matt Smith’ Tag

Matt Smith Says Goodbye to the Doctor – Doctor Who Live: The Next Doctor – BBC – YouTube   Leave a comment

 

Matt Smith describes his approach to being the Doctor, and how hard it is to say goodbye.

Posted August 15, 2014 by Whoogle News in WhoTube Video's

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Matt Smith presents Jenna Coleman with award as Billie Piper also honoured at Glamour Women of the Year Awards   Leave a comment

Last night’s Glamour Women of the Year Awards were an evening of celebration for past and present stars of Doctor Who as Jenna Coleman and Billie Piper both picked up prizes for their acting.

Coleman – who returns as Clara Oswald in the forthcoming series, opposite Peter Capaldi’s new Doctor – collected her award for UK TV actress from former co-star Matt Smith who departed the series last Christmas. Piper – who joined the pair in November’s 50th anniversary special – attended the ceremony with her husband Lawrence Fox and was honoured with the theatre actress award.

The ceremony, which honours women across the industry, were attended by acting royalty Samuel L Jackson, Ryan Reynolds and Helen Mirren, who picked up the icon award and drew gasps from the audience with her expletive-ridden speech.

Also recognised at the Berkeley Square ceremony were Fearne Cotton radio personality, Lily James next breakthrough, Little Mix band, Naomi Campbell TV personality, Emma Willis presenter, Sam Claflin man of the year and Taylor Schilling Editor’s Special Award.

via Radio Times.

David Tennant’s departure nearly ended Doctor Who, reveals Steven Moffat   1 comment

The BBC believed the sci-fi series “wouldn’t succeed at all” without the tenth Doctor, according to the current showrunner, who cast Matt Smith as Tennant’s replacement

Doctor Who minus Matt Smith hardly bears thinking about but, according to showrunner Steven Moffat, his bow tie-wearing, fez-sporting Raggedy Man Doctor nearly didn’t happen…

Speaking yesterday at the Hay Literary Festival, Moffat revealed the BBC were ready to axe the long-running sci-fi series after Smith’s predecessor David Tennant and then-showrunner Russel T Davies announced their departure back in 2008.

“I think there were plans maybe to consider ending it,” said Moffat. “It was Russell T Davies saying, ‘You are not allowed to end it’ [that kept it going].”

He continued, “David owned that role in a spectacular way, gave it an all-new cheeky sexy performance and became a national treasure. So the idea that Doctor Who could go on at all in the absence of David was a huge question.

“I didn’t realise how many people thought it wouldn’t succeed at all. That was quite terrifying when I found out about it later.”

Moffat also told of his initial reluctance to cast a younger actor as Tennant’s replacement – a role that eventually went to then-26-year-old Matt Smith. “I said, ‘We are seeing too many young actors’. Then Matt Smith comes in, and this is what happens when you get casting right.

“The moment Matt started saying that dialogue, with his strange manners and his extraordinary face, he was a hot young guy but he also looked kind of like your barmy uncle. I said, ‘I really like him. What age is he?’ They said ’26’.”

via Radio Times.

Posted May 27, 2014 by Whoogle News in Interviews

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Doctor Who: Matt Smith “will be back” – maybe in a multiple Doctors episode   Leave a comment

We haven’t even seen a full episode featuring his successor Peter Capaldi, and Matt Smith is already talking about making his Doctor Who comeback…

The star has been in touch with showrunner Steven Moffat asking how long he has to wait and says he’d love to do another multiple Doctors story following the success of 50th anniversary episode The Day of the Doctor, in which he appeared alongside his predecessor David Tennant and newly revealed ‘War Doctor” John Hurt.

“I’m just waiting for the next anniversary,” Smith told the Calgary Expo. “I spoke to Steven the other day and said ‘what’s the quickest one we can do?’”

“I love the idea of other Doctors coming back. Also that gives me the opportunity to come back, which I totally will by the way!”

In the meantime, though, Smith has been busy adding more strings to his acting bow, with the lead role in the West End musical adaptation of American Psycho and another apparently equally unhinged part in Ryan Gosling’s controversial movie Lost River.

via Radio Times.

Posted May 21, 2014 by Whoogle News in Interviews

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Steven Moffat: Creating the Doctor Who 50th anniversary episode was “monstrously stressful”   Leave a comment

I don’t think I’ve ever worked on anything that was as difficult, terrifying and as much of a responsibility as writing the 50th anniversary episode of Doctor Who. I wanted everybody to love it. I knew that was impossible, but I wanted people – from those who had never seen it, to the absolute diehard fans who hate every episode I’ve written – to love it. So it was monstrously stressful and very hard: the uncastable cast, the impossible brief, the unwritable script…

I can remember sitting with my wife saying, “I can’t tell if it’s good any more, it could be rubbish – I’ll have to leave the country. I’ll have to fake my own death.” And then going for a meeting with the producers the week I was meant to hand the script in, and we were still trying to assemble the cast. We all just sat there, thinking, “This is impossible, this can’t ever work!”

All of these problems, of course, had been 50 years in the making. There was, I reasoned, only one story to tell if the Doctor was to meet himself – this had to be the day when he saved himself. And in the whole history of Doctor Who, there was only one day he needed saving from.

There was a tremendous crime committed during the Time War that the Christopher Eccleston, David Tennant and Matt Smith Doctors have all referred to, but we’ve never seen it played out or seen the consequences of it. When we got John Hurt, with that extraordinary voice, I knew we could make his Doctor face that day – the most terrible day of his life. We would finally witness that moment.

By the time we discover him, the John Hurt Doctor has been fighting the Time War for centuries. He doesn’t call himself the Doctor, and doesn’t behave like him, either – this is our hero as a dark and battle-hardened general. I think it’s nice for a hero to have a dark chapter, although it’s a chapter we will probably never see again because that somehow isn’t Doctor Who.

Of course the Doctor is always capable of darkness – he makes terrible decisions throughout the show – but this war involved the deadliest of decisions because the stakes were so much higher. The Doctor is a good man, always doing things for a good cause, but at this point he is no longer the happy-go-lucky wanderer; he’s a dark warrior. The Doctor has always been able to solve problems. Here he admits defeat, saying, “I’m going to have to descend to the level of my enemies in order to fix this.”

Once we’d decided on getting more than one Doctor involved we wanted David back. David’s Doctor was struggling to move on from the Time War, Matt Smith’s Doctor had sort of got over the Time War so, add a mysterious Doctor who’s about to commit the crime to which his two future selves have slightly different attitudes, and you have a very complicated, and exciting, scene to write!

The hardest challenge of all was having the Doctor meet himself. For a start, he knows everything he is going to say. If you met yourself you’d probably find yourself slightly dull. And the Doctor can never be boring because most of all he hates being bored. The Doctor is an explorer, a bit of an adrenaline junkie, desperately hungry for new experiences. The universe is so huge and inexhaustible that he can’t bear to sit still. There’s no part of him that thinks that he’s a hero, there to promote justice in the universe. He just stumbles into situations by accident and, because he’s a decent and kind man, always tries to help. But really, all he’s after is new experiences. If you could talk to him he would say, “So many stars, so many planets, so many things to be understood – how can anyone bear to sit down?” He would ban the whole idea of chairs from the universe.

The moment that revealed most about the Doctor during this episode was when John Hurt’s Doctor says to his future selves, “What made you so ashamed of being a grown-up?” They both look at him… it’s him! They don’t want to be like him, and have rejected every single thing he’s like. At which point a lot of things become clear. You suddenly see David and Matt as men trying to repress the memory of the brutal old warrior they once were, and puppying around the place in order to prove that they’re charming and lovely and more human than ever, almost as a denial that they’d ever done anything so dark.

But now all that is over. In Matt Smith’s final episode he spent a thousand years on a planet watching everybody else age to death, while he ages very slowly. The Doctor is being taught a lesson. He’s not a human being, however much he larks around pretending he is. He is different and it’s time to stop play-acting. He goes back to being the trickier version of the Doctor, the fiercer alien wanderer. He’s not apologising, he’s not flirting with you – that’s over. That’s what the Doctor was like after the Time War but he’s not like that any more. He’s gone back and he’s changed it. Now he can go back to being a bit more Time Lordy.

Enter Peter Capaldi. There is something about Peter’s demeanour, his eyes, his attitude – he’s tremendously bright and that comes out on screen. When you choose a Doctor, you want somebody who is utterly compelling, attractive in a very odd way. None of the Doctors are conventionally attractive, but they’re all arresting. Handsome men don’t quite suit. Matt Smith’s a young, good-looking bloke from one angle but is actually the strangest looking man from another. You need that oddity; you need somebody who is carved out of solid star, really. Doctor Who is a whopping great star vehicle, despite the fact it changes star every so often. And so it really is built around the abilities, the charm, the magnetism of a succession of different actors. I’ve cast Matt Smith, Peter Capaldi and John Hurt, but the truth is, they all cast themselves – the easiest thing to spot in the world is sheer brilliance.

I always thought Matt, while a very young man, had something of the demeanour of a much older man, whereas Peter is a man in his 50s but is terribly boyish and young at times. I like the Doctors to have mixed messages about what age they are – you can’t really pin them down. The Doctors are all the same Doctor really, at the end of the day, but you can slide the faders up and down. And to emphasise the senior consultant over the medical student for once reminds people that he’s actually a terrifying old beast. Typically, Matt’s method would do that, too: occasionally just turn cold and you’d think, “You’re not really a puppy are you?” Just like Peter Capaldi’s Doctor will sometimes remind me he’s a big kid at heart.

Doctor Who: The Day of the Doctor is nominated for the Bafta Radio Times Audience Award. Tune into BBC1 at 8:00pm on Sunday to find out who wins.

via Radio Times

Doctor Who Dynamix Figure: 11th Doctor   Leave a comment

The Dynamix Ultra-Stylized Vinyl Figurine Collection offers fans unique interpretations of their favourite characters from the world’s longest-running sci-fi TV show, and this Doctor Who 11th Doctor Dynamix Vinyl Statue is no exception.

Sonic Screwdriver ready for action, the “Raggedy Man” is perfectly captured in all his glory! Switch-out heads – one with his trademark quiff and the other wearing his fez yes, they are cool – offer different display options.

Produced in a limited edition of 3,000 pieces, each figurine comes with a display base, packed in a TARDIS-themed window display box. Whether devouring fish fingers in custard, warding off invading Daleks with a jam-filled biscuit, or saving the universe while wearing a fez, the Eleventh Doctor is a formidable adversary.

Order from Forbidden Planet

Steven Moffat reveals how he chose Peter Capaldi and Matt Smith to play the Doctor   Leave a comment

Doctor Who showrunner Steven Moffat has revealed that one of the key factors in choosing a Doctor is that they are “attractive in a very odd way”.

Writing in this week’s Radio Times, the executive producer and lead writer says that the key to being the Doctor is that you are “carved out of solid star” – but being conventionally good looking is a no-no.

“When you choose a Doctor, you want somebody who is utterly compelling, attractive in a very odd way,” writes Moffat. “None of the Doctors are conventionally attractive, but they’re all arresting. Handsome men don’t quite suit. Matt Smith’s a young, good-looking bloke from one angle but is actually the strangest looking man from another. You need that oddity; you need somebody who is carved out of solid star, really.”

Moffat says that it was easy to cast Matt Smith, Peter Capaldi and John Hurt because of their innate “brilliance”.

“Doctor Who is a whopping great star vehicle, despite the fact it changes star every so often. And so it really is built around the abilities, the charm, the magnetism of a succession of different actors. I’ve cast Matt Smith, Peter Capaldi and John Hurt, but the truth is, they all cast themselves – the easiest thing to spot in the world is sheer brilliance.”

Moffat adds that Capaldi was chosen because “there is something about [his] demeanour, his eyes, his attitude – he’s tremendously bright and that comes out on screen.”

Comparing Smith and Capaldi, he says: “I always thought Matt, while a very young man, had something of the demeanour of a much older man, whereas Peter is a man in his 50s but is terribly boyish and young at times.

“I like the Doctors to have mixed messages about what age they are – you can’t really pin them down. The Doctors are all the same Doctor really, at the end of the day, but you can slide the faders up and down. And to emphasise the senior consultant over the medical student for once reminds people that he’s actually a terrifying old beast. Typically, Matt’s method would do that, too: occasionally just turn cold and you’d think, ‘You’re not really a puppy are you?’ Just like Peter Capaldi’s Doctor will sometimes remind me he’s a big kid at heart.“

Moffat also reveals his anxieties about the 50th anniversary episode before it was aired.

“I can remember sitting with my wife saying, ‘I can’t tell if it’s any good any more, it could be rubbish – I’ll have to leave the country. I’ll have to fake my own death’.”

via Radio Times.

Posted May 13, 2014 by Whoogle News in Magazines

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